Brussels Airport on advice from the Supreme Health Council: “Night flights are necessary”

Brussels Airport on advice from the Supreme Health Council: “Night flights are necessary”
Brussels Airport on advice from the Supreme Health Council: “Night flights are necessary”
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Brussels Airport says it is aware that there is a noise impact from airport activities. “We therefore opt for an approach that improves the quality of life and safeguards activities and jobs at the airport,” Brussels Airport says in a response to our editors. “The noise impact from the airport has already fallen sharply, by as much as 57% between 2000 and 2019, and will fall even further in the coming years due to innovative technologies. But we want to keep the night slots, because they are necessary for cargo operations, but also for the airport’s passenger network.”

The airport in Zaventem mainly points to the economic reality. “Certain cargo is time-sensitive and must be transported as quickly as possible, such as pharmaceutical products. But night flights are also important for passenger companies that have their home base at Brussels Airport. They need those nighttime operations to guarantee their network and hub function, their fleet efficient as possible and to operate profitably.”

Minister Demir: “To denigrate”
Flemish Minister of the Environment Zuhal Demir, who issued the permit for the airport, believes that the call from the Superior Health Council comes late. “Moreover, the call does not address the new conditions imposed on the airport. The justified concern about nighttime nuisance was an important consideration in last month’s permit decision,” says Demir. “Conditions have been imposed, such as the number of seriously disturbed sleepers must decrease by 30 percent by 2032, a ban on the noisiest aircraft and the introduction of quiet weekend nights from 2028.”

Demir also points out the importance of a balanced flying law. “This would greatly reduce the impact on Flanders, but the federal government failed to achieve this, which means that an equitable distribution of the burden has not been achieved. It is a pity that not every government takes its responsibility,” said Demir. “According to Prime Minister De Croo, the permit we have issued is too strict, while others say it is not strict enough. That proves the balance in the permit. And it is up to the operator to take the bait.”

The article is in Dutch

Belgium

Tags: Brussels Airport advice Supreme Health Council Night flights

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