Johnson compares himself to Roman general who returned as dictator

Johnson compares himself to Roman general who returned as dictator
Johnson compares himself to Roman general who returned as dictator

In his farewell speech, the British Prime Minister referred to the Roman general Cincinnatus, who was recalled from retirement to win a war.

“Like a rocket that has served its purpose, I’m going back into the atmosphere. Then I’ll land invisibly in a remote corner of the Pacific.’ These are the last words that Johnson, now 58, utters as prime minister. But invisibility and Boris Johnson? That seems like a difficult combination.

“Like Cincinnatus, I return to my squad. I will offer this government nothing more than my most fervent support.’ Die Cincinnatus, a Roman general, is best known for his spectacular comeback. He was already retired as a leader when he was suddenly asked to serve his people again in the war. Cincinnatus was busy on the field, but put his team aside for that request. Sixteen days later, he came back from the war victorious and plowed the rest of his fields.

Boris Johnson passes torch to Liz Truss with confidence

Dictator

It sounds heroic, but at the same time it’s not the happiest comparison. To win that war, Cincinnatus was made dictator. He was not very popular. He opposed the rights of the plebs, the common people.

Historian and author Tom Holland tweets: “To be fair, Cincinnatus was admired by the Romans for using his dictatorial power for as long as necessary.” So he didn’t hold on to posts. A contrast to Johnson’s route over partygate. Although one illegal lockdown party after another was publicized several months ago, Johnson tried to talk his way out and cling to power.

The article is in Dutch

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