American tourist (80) dies in elephant attack during safari

American tourist (80) dies in elephant attack during safari
American tourist (80) dies in elephant attack during safari
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An 80-year-old American woman was attacked by an elephant while on a car safari in Zambia. The woman and five other tourists were chased by the elephant for hundreds of meters until the driver had to stop the vehicle due to a road blockade.

An American woman, whose identity is not yet known, went on a car safari in the Kafue National Park in Zambia last weekend. Together with five other American tourists, she was guided through the second largest national park in the world, when an aggressive elephant unexpectedly started chasing them.

The elephant is said to have become separated from its herd and was trying to overtake the vehicle while walking. One of the tourists in the car filmed how the elephant chased them for hundreds of meters until the driver suddenly stopped the vehicle. The road was said to have been partly blocked by vegetation, which prevented the guide from removing the vehicle from the danger zone quickly enough.

The elephant managed to tip the vehicle on its side with its large tusks, with dire consequences. The shocking images are circulating on social media.

The 80-year-old woman died a little later from her injuries. Another tourist was said to be seriously injured and was evacuated to a hospital in South Africa. The other tourists had minor injuries and are receiving trauma counseling.

“This is a tragic event and we extend our deepest condolences to the family of the deceased. We also support the other tourists and the guide involved in this distressing incident,” said Keith Vincent, the CEO of the company that organized the safari.

The article is in Dutch

Tags: American tourist dies elephant attack safari

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